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Arielor6

My PCDuino doesn't work!

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My PCDuino Lite Wifi had worked perfectly for a month, but now it has some problems, i.e. it starts with normally and any problem, but in approximately 5 minutes it halts without any advice or an error alert and it power off. I tried to reinstall the image but it does not fix the bug.

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There is a short circuit, or something is not connected correctly.  I have heard of many stories like that.

 

The other option is there is too little power.  Check what the total amps you are getting from the power sources and see if that meets your boards power specifications.  Also too many amps or "power" can cause damage to components.

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There is a short circuit, or something is not connected correctly.  I have heard of many stories like that.

 

The other option is there is too little power.  Check what the total amps you are getting from the power sources and see if that meets your boards power specifications.

 

These sound like possible causes. Most computers will not allow a full 2 amps from their USB ports unless it's a special charging port; most phone chargers also cannot handle 2 amps (take a look into a tablet charger -- those are generally designed to handle between 2 to 2.4 amps).

 

When you're looking for a charger, if it shows the rating in "mA" instead of "A", that's just milliamps. 2000mA = 2A, so if the charger is rated at least 2000mA or 2A you're fine.

 

  Also too many amps or "power" can cause damage to components.

 

This is almost completely incorrect. I can connect a 0.25 amp device (load) to a regulated supply capable of 50 amps and it will be perfectly fine. Too many volts, on the other hand, can damage a device.

 

Now if you are using a linear power supply, then putting too small of a load (e.g. 2 amps) on a large supply (e.g. 5 amps) will cause the voltage to increase, and you'll have a dead device. That's why they're called linear: they put out a fixed amount of power -- wattage. Watts = amps × volts , and if the amps drawn goes down, the volts supplied goes up; similarly, if you overload a linear supply and the amps drawn go up, the volts supplied go down.

 

It's usually pretty easy to differentiate a linear supply from a switching supply: linear supplies are the boxier, heftier ones (one rated at 2 amps or more would weigh at least as much as a 50-cent roll of pennies) while regulated supplies tend to have other form factors (flat, rectangular, etc) and are much lighter (weighing about as much as 20 pennies, maybe less). For electronics, you should always go with a switching supply -- all switching supplies are regulated so you know what voltage you're getting.

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